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Chesapeake City, MD. © 2002 S. Fox.
Chesapeake City, Maryland

Once known as "The Village of Bohemia", Chesapeake City, Maryland is today a charming little town with 19th century homes, quaint stores, antique shops, B&Bs and seven restaurants offering up Maryland specialties to travelers stopping by boat or car.

Just 35 miles from the heart of the Brandywine Valley, Chesapeake City is a taste of the 1800s in a town that owes its heritage and boom years to Augustine Herman, the man behind the C & D Canal. His canal project created locks that joined the Delaware River and Chesapeake Bay. Construction began in 1824 and was completed 5 years later. The small port town of Bohemia would never be the same... not even in name which it changed in 1839.

Today, the locks and wooden bridges are gone. They were removed after the canal was purchased by the state of Maryland in 1919 and the channel deepened and widened to accommodate large cargo ships on their way to Philadelphia from the port of Baltimore.

The town's Canal Museum tells the story of the C & D Canal and the town itself, but you don't need to know its history to enjoy a visit to Chesapeake City.

We recommend driving down for lunch and enjoying a walk about the town, a tour on the water, or both. During the summer they hold Canal Days, with outdoor concerts and other activities. In 2002, "Summertime in the Park" concerts are held on Sundays during July and August. For a schedule of events and directions to Chesapeake City, click to the city's Web site below.

Chesapeake City Web Links
ChesapeakeCity.com
The Bayard House Restaurant
Blue Max Inn
Chesapeake Inn

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